CONMONSense Range

CONMONSense Range is a Standalone, Permanent Mount, Ultrasound Sensor designed to integrate with standard industrial measurement systems

CONMONSense delivers precise, repeatable data about the health of your assets and electrical systems also in the most challenging environment.

Its resonant piezo element is optimized for ultrasound driven lubrication, mechanical fault detection, and monitoring the health of valves, steam, hydraulic systems and electrical defects.

Ultrasound is a true measure of the FITness of your facility. Most assets produce FRICTION, IMPACTING, and TURBULENCE as defect indicators. CONMONSense hears these phenomena at their inception and delivers an analog signal response to your connected measurement system.

With an output range from 4-20mA or from 0-10V, CONMONSense mounts permanently to any asset to provide continuous condition monitoring data.
Avoid unplanned downtime and put the safety of your plant and colleagues first.

CONMONSense Contact Sensor

Permanent contact/structure (IP65) sensor for continuous monitoring bearings lubrication, valves, steam traps, hydraulics systems and rotating assets, even the slowest ones.

CONMONSense Airborne Sensor

Airborne open (IP40) and enclosed (IP65) for inspection of electrical systems.

The design of this sensor allows precise and repetitive measurements to continuously monitor your electrical cabinet’s health. Put the safety of your plant and colleagues first.

Download the sensors datasheets
For an easy configuration check the SDT CONMONSense Configuration Interface

Questions concerning CONMONSense Range

CONMONSense RSC (4-20mA Sensor)

Note that the sensor does need an external 24VDC supply capable to deliver at least 40 mA.

CONMONSense wiring: 

1 = 24VDC Power supply (+)
2 = Current output (Iout)
3 = 0V (-)
4 = Communication line (should be left floating if not used)

If your system has a dedicated 4-20mA input, here is a possible wiring:

If your system does not have a dedicated 4-20mA but has an analog voltage input, here is a possible wiring:

Note that these wirings are only used as example, you should refer to your system technical document to ensure a correct wiring with your installation.

Static mode:

Equation for each amplification:


Example: a static output current of 12 [mA] is the result of a sensor output voltage of (0.012 * 10) = 0.120 [V] or 120 [mV] or 101.5 [dB]µV


Example: a static output current of 12 [mA] is the result of a sensor output voltage of (0.012 * 2.5) = 0.03 [V] or 30 [mV] or 89.5 [dB]µV


Example: a static output current of 12 [mA] will result in a sensor output voltage of (0.012 / 1.6) = 0.0075 [V] or 7.5 [mV] or 77.5 [dB]µV


Example: a static output current of 12 [mA] will result in a sensor output voltage of (0.012 / 6.3) = 0.0019 [V] or 1.9 [mV] or 65.5 [dB]µV


Example: a static output current of 12 [mA] will result in a sensor output voltage of (0.012 / 25.1) = 0.00048 [V] or 0.48 [mV] or 53.5 [dB]µV


Example: a static output current of 12 [mA] will result in a sensor output voltage of (0.012 / 100) = 0.00012 [V] or 0.12 [mV] or 41.5 [dB]µV

Dynamic mode:

Equation for each amplification:


Example: a dynamic output current of 1 [mA] will result in a sensor output voltage of (0.001 * 208.25) = 0.20825 [V] or 208.25 [mV] or 106.3 [dB]µV


Example: a dynamic output current of 1 [mA] will result in a sensor output voltage of (0.001 * 52) = 0.052 [V] or 52 [mV] or 94.3 [dB]µV


Example: a dynamic output current of 1 [mA] will result in a sensor output voltage of (0.001 * 13) = 0.013 [V] or 13 [mV] or 82.3 [dB]µV


Example: a dynamic output current of 1 [mA] will result in a sensor output voltage of (0.001 * 3.3) = 0.0033 [V] or 3.3 [mV] or 70.3 [dB]µV


Example: a dynamic output current of 1 [mA] will result in a sensor output voltage of (0.001 / 1.2) = 0.00083 [V] or 0.83 [mV] or 58.3 [dB]µV


Example: a dynamic output current of 1 [mA] will result in a sensor output voltage of (0.001 / 4.8) = 0.00021 [V] or 0.21 [mV] or 46.3 [dB]µV

Note that the dynamic mode is an alternative output (AC) with a bias current (DC) of 12 [mA].

In order to modify the internal amplification of the sensors or to switch from static to dynamic mode, a communication needs to be established between the system and the sensor.

Using a digital output

If your system has a digital output module you can connect one output to the sensor communication line using this kind of schematic:

Then simply generate pulses according to the CONMONSense datasheet in order to modify the amplification or the mode.

Using a serial communication

It is also possible to communicate using a serial communication with the following specifications:

  • Protocol: UART
  • Baudrate: 9600 bps
  • Data bits: 8
  • Parity: Even
  • Stop bit: 1

CONMONSense sensors are using a proprietary protocol described in the datasheet.

The best way to implement an amplification control is by following these simple rules:

Static mode

  • If the static output current (DC) is higher than 20 [mA] à decrease the amplification by one step (12 [dB])
  • If the static output current (DC) is lower than 4 [mA] à increase the amplification by one step (12 [dB])

Dynamic mode

  • If the signal peak is higher than 18 [mA] (or 6 [mA] if bias current is removed) à decrease the amplification by one step (12 [dB])
  • If the signal peak is lower than 13 [mA] (or 1 [mA] if bias current is removed) à increase the amplification by one step (12 [dB])

Note that the dynamic mode is an alternative output (AC) with a bias current (DC) of 12 [mA].

CONMONSense RSV (0-10V Sensor)

Note that the sensor does need an external 24VDC supply capable to deliver at least 40 mA.

CONMONSense wiring:

1 = 24VDC Power supply (+)
2 = Voltage output (Vout)
3 = 0V (-)
4 = Communication line (should be left floating if not used)

If your system has a dedicated 0-10V analog voltage input, here is a possible wiring:

Note that this wiring is only used as an example, you should refer to your system technical document to ensure a correct wiring with your installation.

Static mode:


Equation for each amplification:


Example: an output voltage of 5 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (5 / 25) = 0.2 [V] or 200 [mV] or 106 [dB]µV


Example: an output voltage of 5 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (5 / 100) = 0.05 [V] or 50 [mV] or 94 [dB]µV


Example: an output voltage of 5 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (5 / 400) = 0.0125 [V] or 12.5 [mV] or 82 [dB]µV


Example: an output voltage of 5 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (5 / 1575) = 0.0032 [V] or 3.2 [mV] or 70 [dB]µV


Example: an output voltage of 5 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (5 / 6275) = 0.0008 [V] or 0.8 [mV] or 58 [dB]µV


Example: an output voltage of 5 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (5 / 25000) = 0.0002 [V] or 0.2 [mV] or 46 [dB]µV

 

Dynamic mode:


Equation for each amplification:


Example: a dynamic output voltage of 1 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (1 / 1.2) = 0.833 [V] or 833 [mV] or 118.3 [dB]µV


Example: a dynamic output voltage of 1 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (1 / 4.8) = 0.208 [V] or 208 [mV] or 106.3 [dB]µV


Example: a dynamic output voltage of 1 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (1 / 19.2) = 0.0521 [V] or 52.1 [mV] or 94.3 [dB]µV


Example: a dynamic output voltage of 1 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (1 / 75.6) = 0.0132 [V] or 13.2 [mV] or 82.3 [dB]µV


Example: an output voltage of 1 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (1 / 301.2) = 0.0033 [V] or 3.3 [mV] or 70.3 [dB]µV


Example: an output voltage of 1 [V] will result in a sensor output voltage of (1 / 1200) = 0.00083 [V] or 0.83 [mV] or 58.3 [dB]µV

Note that the dynamic mode is an alternative output (AC) with a bias voltage (DC) of 3 [V].

In order to modify the internal amplification of the sensors or to switch from static to dynamic mode, a communication needs to be established between the PLC and the sensor.

Using a digital output

If your PLC has a digital output module you can connect one output to the sensor communication line using this kind of schematic:

Then simply generate pulses according to the CONMONSense datasheet in order to modify the amplification or the mode.

Using a serial communication

It is also possible to communicate using a serial communication with the following specification:

• Protocol: UART
• Baudrate: 9600 bps
• Data bits: 8
• Parity: Even
• Stop bit: 1

CONMONSense sensors are using a proprietary protocol described in the datasheet.

The best way to implement an amplification control is by following these simple rules:

Static mode

  • If the output voltage (DC) is higher than 5 [V] à decrease the amplification by one step (12 [dB])
  • If the output voltage (DC) is lower than 1 [V] à increase the amplification by one step (12 [dB])

Dynamic mode

  • If the signal peak is higher than 4.5 [V] (or 1.5 [V] if bias voltage is removed) à decrease the amplification by one step (12 [dB])
  • If the signal peak is lower than 3.5 [V] (or 0.5 [V] if bias voltage is removed) à increase the amplification by one step (12 [dB])

Note that the dynamic mode is an alternative output (AC) with a bias voltage (DC) of 3 [V].